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What do you do on a day-to-day basis?

My job consists of reading, writing and editing in one way or another every day. Many of my coworkers joke that I’m “the only one at the firm who can write” so a large variety of content passes my desk for editing. While my responsibilities are different day-to-day, I am primarily responsible for content creation and editing for everything from internal and external newsletters, blogs, emails, handouts and presentations. I’ve taken on some larger projects such as creating a Brand Book and Content Style Guide for my company, establishing the tone, voice and style of writing for my company. I don’t have a finance background, so I try to read an article or two every day to enhance my knowledge of the public funds’ sector.

How did your experience at CMU prepare you for your career?

CMU taught me how to work hard but how to enjoy the hard work. My professors were passionate about English and reading as well as writing and their passion became my passion. They loved what they were doing and had made careers out of their love for the English language. I quickly knew I didn’t want to be a professor (although the thought did cross my mind a few times), but I knew I wanted writing to be a large part of my career.

What was your transition like from being a student to your current career position?

I’ve had a bit of an unorthodox path from student to employee. After graduating from CMU, I moved to Vail for two years to live the stereotypical ski bum life before pursuing my master’s degree in the fall of 2016. I landed an internship that turned into my current full-time job. So, there was a time that I was working full-time and going to school full-time. Now that I’m done, I miss being a student, but I’ve been enjoying a regular sleep schedule.

What do you think set you apart from the other applicants for your current position?

I went into the interview knowing I knew nothing about finance or investment, so I knew I would have to explain how my skills would positively impact the business. I had a positive attitude and explained my very basic experience of writing and marketing in a professional setting and my willingness to learn a new industry. After the interview, my now boss had me create a sample blurb on the company for him based on their website and that was my chance to let my writing skills speak for themselves.

What advice would you give to incoming college students?

My main advice, particularly to those of you pursuing English degrees, is to take internships (and later jobs) that may not sound like your dream job but they will allow you to write or edit or both! No matter what industry, your writing skills will improve so much, and you’ll gain an understanding of what writing looks like in a professional setting. Prepare yourself by taking classes that will look good on your resume and that will allow you to write for any industry because you never know who will want your unique writing style and skills. When I was younger, I told myself “as long as you’re writing, any job is your dream job” and that’s a motto I still live by today.

Connect with Emmie on LinkedIn

Published 7/25/2018